Nestlé Driving Test for Men

The 1920s saw Nestlé‘s first expansion into new products, with chocolate the company’s second most important activity.

Russia was one of a first countries to ever adopt driver’s licences, with first ones issued in 1900 by Saint-Petersburg authorities, and joined international convention in 1909, but due to relatively small number of automobiles these attempts were rather sporadic and limited to major centers only. No comprehensive system of drivers’ licensing were present until 1936, when Soviet government finally organized and standardized traffic and driving regulations, with this state-wide system to be regulated by specialized police authorities.

BMW Kinetic Sculptures

BMW (abbreviation of Bayerische Motoren Werke, or in English, Bavarian Motor Works), is an independent German company and manufacturer of automobiles and motorcycles.

Theo Jansen is an artist and kinetic sculptor living and working in Holland. He builds large works which resemble skeletons of animals which are able to walk using the wind on the beaches of the Netherlands. His animated works are a fusion of art and engineering. In a BMW television commercial, Jansen says “The walls between art and engineering exist only in our minds.”

The ZAZ Tavria runs on a drop of Lighter Fluid

The ZAZ Tavria (Ukrainian: Таврія) is a range of front wheel drive subcompact cars made by Ukrainian ZAZ. The Tavria and subsequent Dana and Slavuta replaced rear wheel drive Zaporozhets in the product lineup.

Fuel economy is the amount of fuel required to move a vehicle over a given distance. While the fuel efficiency of petroleum engines has improved markedly in recent decades, this does not necessarily translate into fuel economy of cars, as people in developed countries tend to buy bigger and heavier cars.

The cases of Zippo lighters are typically made of metal and are rectangular-shaped with a hinged top. Inside the case are the works of the lighter: the spring-toggle lever that keeps the top closed, the wick, windscreen, thumbwheel, and flint, all of which are mounted on an open-bottom metal box that is slightly smaller than the bottom of the outer case, and into which it slips snugly. The hollow part of the interior box encloses a rayon batt which is in contact with the wick. The fuel, a volatile flammable liquid commonly known as lighter fluid (usually naptha), is poured into the batt, which traps it.

Trabant 601

The Trabant is an automobile formerly produced by East German auto maker VEB Sachsenring Automobilwerke Zwickau in Zwickau, Saxony. It was the most common vehicle in East Germany, and was also exported to other countries in the communist bloc. The main selling points were that it had room for four adults and luggage, and was compact, light and durable. Despite its poor performance and smoky two-stroke engine, the car has come to be regarded with affection as a symbol of the more positive sides of East Germany (in former East Germany) and of the fall of communism (in former West Germany, as many East Germans streamed into West Berlin and West Germany in their Trabants after the opening of the Berlin Wall in 1989). It was in production without any significant change for nearly 30 years.

The engine for both the Trabant 500 and 601 was a small two-stroke engine with two cylinders, giving the vehicle modest performance. At the end of production it delivered 25 horsepower (19 kW) from a 600 cc displacement. The car took 21 seconds from 0 to 100 km/h and the top speed was 112 km/h. There were two main problems with the engine: the smoky exhaust and the pollution it produced.

Hyundai’s Toy Boy

The Hyundai Motor Company (Hangul: 현대 자동차 주식회사), a division of the Hyundai Kia Automotive Group, is South Korea’s largest car maker. It is headquartered in Seoul, South Korea. In 2005, the combined sales of the Hyundai Kia Automotive Group made it the world’s sixth largest vehicle manufacturer.

Toyboy is sexual slang referring to a boyfriend of an older woman or man.