I’d like an Atari 2600 system please and everything that goes with it

Originally known as the Atari VCS—for Video Computer System—the machine’s name was changed to “Atari 2600” (from the unit’s Atari part number, CX2600) in 1982, after the release of the more advanced Atari 5200. It was wildly successful, and during the 1980s, “Atari” was a synonym for this model in mainstream media. The 2600 was typically bundled with two joystick controllers, a conjoined pair of paddle controllers, and a cartridge game – initially Combat and subsequently Pac-Man.

At the time, the 2600 was the most popular video game console in the world and Pac-Man was the most popular arcade game in the world, so Atari widely promoted the 2600 version of the game. Upon release, however, the quality of the adaptation of the game was criticized and sales were well below expectations, and even those who bought and kept the game were often dissatisfied.

Atari Video Computer Spiele

Atari continued to scoop up licenses during the shelf life of the 2600, the most prominent of which included Pac-Man and E.T. Public disappointment with these two titles and the market saturation of bad third-party titles are cited as big reasons for the video game crash of 1983. Suddenly, Atari’s growth meant it was losing massive amounts of money during the crash, at one point about $10,000 a day. Warner quickly grew tired of supporting the now-headless company, and started looking for buyers in 1984.

Arby’s New Pac-Man Glass

Arby’s is currently franchised by Triarc, who also franchises T.J. Cinnamons and Pasta Connection and once owned Royal Crown Cola (better known as R.C. Cola), which Arby’s sold until the mid-1990’s.

[Pac-Man] was developed primarily by Namco employee Toru Iwatani over eighteen months. The original title was pronounced pakku-man (パックマン, pakku-man) and was inspired by the Japanese onomatopoeic phrase paku-paku taberu (パクパク食べる, paku-paku taberu), where paku-paku describes (the sound of) the mouth movement when widely opened and then closed in succession. Although it is often cited that the characteristic shape was inspired by a pizza missing a slice, he admitted in a 1986 interview that it was a half-truth and the character design also came from simplifying and rounding out the Japanese character for mouth, kuchi (口) as well as the basic concept of eating.