McDonald’s Hell

With the successful expansion of McDonald’s into many international markets, the company has become a symbol of globalization and the spread of the American way of life. Its prominence has also made it a frequent subject of public debates about obesity, corporate ethics and consumer responsibility.

Judaism does not have a specific doctrine about the afterlife, but it does have a tradition of describing Gehenna. Gehenna is not hell, but rather a sort of Purgatory where one is judged based on his or her life’s deeds. The Kabbalah describes it as a “waiting room” (commonly translated as an “entry way”) for all souls (not just the wicked). The overwhelming majority of rabbinic thought maintains that people are not in Gehenna forever; the longest that one can be there is said to be 11 months, however there has been the occasional noted exception. Some consider it a spiritual forge where the soul is purified for its eventual ascent to Olam Habah (heb. עולם הבא; lit. “The world to come”, often viewed as analogous to Heaven). This is also mentioned in the Kabbalah, where the soul is described as breaking, like the flame of a candle lighting another: the part of the soul that ascends being pure and the “unfinished” piece being reborn.

Jason Alexander sings and dances for the McDLT

Jason Alexander (born September 23, 1959) is a television, cinema and musical theatre actor, best known for his role as George Costanza on the hit television series Seinfeld.

George Louis Costanza is a fictional character on the United States-based television sitcom Seinfeld (1989–1998), played by Jason Alexander. He has variously been described as a “short, stocky, slow-witted, bald man” (by Elaine Benes), “Lord of the Idiots” (by Costanza himself), and as “the greatest sitcom character of all time”.

The McDLT is perhaps best remembered for its marketing, which focused on variations of the theme “Keep the hot side hot, and the cool side cool.” A fairly well-remembered 1985 commercial released to market the new sandwich featured a young Jason Alexander, and has obtained a minor following on the web.

For more McDonalds commercials, check out Video Ichiban.

McDonald’s Arch Deluxe Elevator

The Arch Deluxe was a hamburger created and marketed by McDonald’s with the intent of capturing the adult fast food consumer market, presented as a more sophisticated burger for an adult palate. It failed to catch on and is seen as one of the most expensive flops of all time.

In response to the demographic trend of longer lifespans and an expanding older market, McDonald’s made a conscious decision to attempt to market their food to a more adult audience. Rather than compromise their existing brand images, they decided to create a new line of burgers with more sophisticated ingredients. They commissioned Executive Chef Andrew Selvaggio to create the Deluxe line of burgers including the Fish Filet Deluxe, Grilled Chicken Deluxe, Crispy Chicken Deluxe and the flagship Arch Deluxe.

McDLT or Whopper?

The McDLT (McDonald’s Lettuce and Tomato) was a hamburger product based on a novel form of packaging. The meat portion was prepared separately from the other toppings, such as lettuce and tomato, and then both were packaged into a specially designed two-sided container. The consumer was then expected to finalize preparation of the sandwich by combining the hot and cool sides just prior to eating. The company discontinued the sandwich in 1990 due to the move away from the environmentally unsound styrofoam packaging which was integral to the McDLT “experience”.

The Original Whopper sandwich is a hamburger, consisting of a quarter-pound fire-grilled beef patty, sesame seed bun, mayonnaise, lettuce, tomato, pickles, ketchup, and sliced onion. Optional ingredients such as American cheese, bacon, mustard or Jalapeño peppers may be added upon request. Regional and international condiments include BBQ sauce, Salsa and Guacamole. BK will also add any condiment it sells, including Tartar sauce, honey mustard, Steak sauce and hot sauce.

Although some people diagnosed with schizophrenia may hear voices and may experience the voices as distinct personalities, schizophrenia does not involve a person changing among distinct multiple personalities. The confusion perhaps arises in part due to the meaning of [Eugene] Bleuler’s term ‘schizophrenia’ (literally ‘split’ or ‘shattered mind’).