McDonald’s Mint Shamrock Shakes and Sundaes

The Shamrock Shake is a seasonal green-dyed mint flavored milkshake dessert sold at McDonald’s during March to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day. In 1980, McDonald’s introduced the Shamrock Sundae which consisted of vanilla ice cream topped with a mint green Shamrock syrup. The product was discontinued after one year due to poor sales.

Restaurants with the highest volume of traffic, such as McDonald’s, often opt to use premade milkshake mixtures that are prepared in automatic milkshake machines.

The sundae is a sweet ice cream dessert.

Spearmint is a flavour used mainly in chewing gums and tooth paste that is either naturally or artificially created to taste like oil of spearmint (herb). It is also popular as a flavouring for milkshakes in Canada and the U.S.; during each March, McDonald’s puts them out as a Shamrock Shake.

In recent years, Saint Patrick’s Day” target=”_blank”>Saint Patrick’s Day celebrations for having become too commercialised and for fostering negative stereotypes of the Irish. Some have described St Patrick’s Day celebrations outside Ireland as displays of “Plastic Paddyness”; where foreigners appropriate and misrepresent Irish culture, claim Irish identity, and enact Irish stereotypes.

Round up your mates for a Guinness on St Patrick’s Day

Saint Patrick’s Day or the Feast of Saint Patrick is a cultural and religious holiday celebrated annually on 17 March, the death date of the most commonly-recognised patron saint of Ireland, Saint Patrick (c. AD 385–461).

Stout is a dark beer made using roasted malt or roasted barley, hops, water and yeast.

Since the 1930s in the face of falling sales, Guinness has had a long history of marketing campaigns, from award-winning television advertisements to beer mats and posters. Before then, Guinness had almost no advertising, instead allowing for word of mouth to sell the product.

The Border Collie is a working and herding dog breed developed in the English-Scottish border region for herding livestock, especially sheep.