I drink Dr. Pepper and I’m proud

Arguably the most famous of Dr Pepper‘s advertising campaigns was their “Be a Pepper” series. These commercials referred to fans of Dr Pepper as “Peppers,” and often featured crowd dance scenes with elaborate, over-the-top choreography. One popular ad included the jingle:

“I’m a Pepper, He’s a Pepper
She’s a Pepper, We’re a pepper
Wouldn’t You Like to be a Pepper, Too?
Be a Pepper~ Drink Dr Pepper”

A jingle is a memorable slogan, set to an engaging melody, mainly broadcast on radio and sometimes on television commercials.

Max Headroom interviews Pepsi for New Coke

Max Headroom is the name of a fictional artificial intelligence, known for his surreal wit and a stuttering, distorted, electronically sampled delivery. The character was created by Peter Wagg, Annabel Jankel and Rocky Morton and performed by Matt Frewer.

The [Max Headroom New Coke] campaign was launched with a memorable television commercial, produced by McCann-Erickson New York, with Max saying in his trademark stutter, “C-c-c-catch the wave!” and referring to his fellow “Cokeologists”. In a riposte to Pepsi’s televisual teasings, one showed Headroom asking a Pepsi can he was “interviewing” how it felt about more drinkers preferring the new Coke to it and then cut to the condensation forming on the can. “Sweating?” he asked. It was a huge success, and surveys likewise showed that more than three-quarters of the target market were aware of the ads within two days. Coke’s corporate hotline received more calls about him than any previous spokesperson, some even asking if he was married.

Charge! Get going again with Dr Pepper

Dr Pepper is a caramel-colored, carbonated soft drink marketed in North America by Cadbury Schweppes Americas Beverages (CSAB), a unit of Cadbury Schweppes. Dr Pepper is [also] the name of a poker variant, whereby in addition to jokers, the cards 10, 2, and 4 are wild cards (taken from a previous advertising slogan which encouraged customers to drink a Dr Pepper at 10, 2, and 4 o’clock).

Pepsi Steps on Coke

According to Consumer Reports, in the 1970s, the rivalry [between Pepsi and Coca-Cola] continued to heat up the market. Pepsi conducted blind taste tests in stores, in what was called the “Pepsi Challenge”. These tests suggested that more consumers preferred the taste of Pepsi (which is believed to have more lemon oil, less orange oil, and uses vanillin rather than vanilla) to Coke. The sales of Pepsi started to climb, and Pepsi kicked off the “Challenge” across the [United States].