Super Hero fights for Super Tide

Tide is the name of a popular laundry detergent on the market in the United States, Canada and other countries like Morocco. It is manufactured by Procter & Gamble. First introduced in test markets in 1946 with national distribution reached in 1949, Tide was touted as “America’s Washday Favorite.” It quickly gained dominance in the detergent market, dwarfing the sales of other P&G products, such as Ivory Snow, as well as the competition from Rinso. The latter two were soap products. Originally, Tide was a white powdered solid, but the brand line was later expanded to include a liquid form, an orange-tinted clear fluid; today, liquid Tide is generally a darkish blue color.

Snap Crackle Pop makes the world go round

Rice Krispies (called Rice Bubbles in Australia) is a brand of breakfast cereal that has been produced by Kellogg’s since 1928. They are made of rice grain which is cooked, dried and toasted. These kernels bubble and rise in a manner which forms very thin walls. When the cereal is exposed to milk or juices, these walls tend to collapse suddenly, creating the famous “Snap, crackle and pop” sounds. This is in contrast to puffed rice, which was introduced in 1904.

Snap, Crackle and Pop! are the cartoon mascots of Kellogg’s breakfast cereal Rice Krispies (Rice Bubbles in Australia).

Charge! Get going again with Dr Pepper

Dr Pepper is a caramel-colored, carbonated soft drink marketed in North America by Cadbury Schweppes Americas Beverages (CSAB), a unit of Cadbury Schweppes. Dr Pepper is [also] the name of a poker variant, whereby in addition to jokers, the cards 10, 2, and 4 are wild cards (taken from a previous advertising slogan which encouraged customers to drink a Dr Pepper at 10, 2, and 4 o’clock).

Newport tastes smoother, on TV

Modern cigarettes produced after the 1950s are composed mainly of shredded tobacco leaf and their processing by-products. Each cigarette’s tobacco blend is made mainly from the leaves of flue-cured brightleaf, burley tobacco, and oriental tobacco. These leaves are selected, processed, and aged prior to blending and filling. The processing of brightleaf and burley tobaccos for tobacco leaf “strips” produces several by-products such as leaf stems, tobacco dust, and tobacco leaf pieces (“small laminate”).

Menthol has local anesthetic and counterirritant qualities, and it is widely used to relieve minor throat irritation.

Smoking, particularly of cigarettes, is by far the main contributor to lung cancer, which at least in theory makes it one of the easiest diseases to prevent. In the United States, smoking is estimated to account for 87% of lung cancer cases (90% in men and 79% in women), and in the UK for 90%.

The Flintstones smoke Winstons

The Flintstones is an American animated television series produced by Hanna-Barbera Productions [and] was one of the most successful sitcoms of all time. Inspired by the 1950s live-action sitcom The Honeymooners, The Flintstones was about a working class caveman’s life with his family and his next door neighbor / best friend. The first prime time cartoon geared for adults, the show originally aired from 1960 to 1966, on the ABC network.

The series was initially aimed at adult audiences; the first season was sponsored by Winston cigarettes and the characters appeared in several commercials for Winstons.

Winston cigarettes are manufactured for or by R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company. They are named for Winston-Salem, North Carolina, the city where RJR was founded and headquartered.

The brand was introduced in 1954, and became the best-selling brand of cigarettes in the United States. It held the #1 spot from 1966 to 1972, thanks to the successful marketing slogan “Winston tastes good like a cigarette should.” In the last national survey in 2001, Winston ranks sixth in market value. It is also known for their claim of being “additive free” although a secondary warning label on their advertisements states that “no additives in our tobacco does NOT mean a safer cigarette.”

Smoking, particularly of cigarettes, is by far the main contributor to lung cancer, which at least in theory makes it one of the easiest diseases to prevent. In the United States, smoking is estimated to account for 87% of lung cancer cases (90% in men and 79% in women), and in the UK for 90%.

Trabant 601

The Trabant is an automobile formerly produced by East German auto maker VEB Sachsenring Automobilwerke Zwickau in Zwickau, Saxony. It was the most common vehicle in East Germany, and was also exported to other countries in the communist bloc. The main selling points were that it had room for four adults and luggage, and was compact, light and durable. Despite its poor performance and smoky two-stroke engine, the car has come to be regarded with affection as a symbol of the more positive sides of East Germany (in former East Germany) and of the fall of communism (in former West Germany, as many East Germans streamed into West Berlin and West Germany in their Trabants after the opening of the Berlin Wall in 1989). It was in production without any significant change for nearly 30 years.

The engine for both the Trabant 500 and 601 was a small two-stroke engine with two cylinders, giving the vehicle modest performance. At the end of production it delivered 25 horsepower (19 kW) from a 600 cc displacement. The car took 21 seconds from 0 to 100 km/h and the top speed was 112 km/h. There were two main problems with the engine: the smoky exhaust and the pollution it produced.